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Warm up impala

Explorer

Hi,

 

I have noticed that when I restart impala in cloudera manager when I am trying to run queries the execution time is bigger than the usual.  Is there any way to warm up impala somehow and after run the queries ? 

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions

Re: Warm up impala

Mentor

@drgenious 

Primo Impala shares metadata [data about data] with HMS Hive Metastore.
Impala uses HDFS caching to provide performance and scalability benefits in production environments where Impala queries and other Hadoop jobs operate on quantities of data much larger than the physical RAM on the DataNodes, making it impractical to rely on the Linux OS cache, which only keeps the most recently used data in memory. Data read from the HDFS cache avoids the overhead of checksumming and memory-to-memory copying involved when using data from the Linux OS cache.

 

Having said that when you restart impala you are discarding all the Cached Metadata [Location of table, permissions, query execution plans, or statistics] that makes it efficient. That explains why after the restart your queries are so slow.


Impala is very efficient if it reads from data that is pinned in memory through HDFS caching. It takes advantage of the HDFS API and reads the data from memory rather than from disk whether the data files are pinned using Impala DDL statements, or using the command-line mechanism where you specify HDFS paths.

There is no better source of Impala information than Cloudera I will urge you to take time and read the below documentation to pin the option in your memory 🙂

 

Using HDFS Caching with Impala
Configuring HDFS Caching for Impala

There are 2 other options that you should think of as less expensive than restarting Impala I can't imagine you you have more than 70 data nodes

 

INVALIDATE METADATA

Is an asynchronous operation that simply discards the loaded metadata from the catalog and coordinator caches. After that operation, the catalog and all the Impala coordinators only know about the existence of databases and tables and nothing more. Metadata loading for tables is triggered by any subsequent queries.

REFRESH

Reloads the metadata synchronously. REFRESH is more lightweight than doing a full metadata load after a table has been invalidated. REFRESH cannot detect changes in block locations triggered by operations like HDFS balancer, hence causing remote reads during query execution with negative performance implications.


The INVALIDATE METADATA statement marks the metadata for one or all tables as stale. The next time the Impala service performs a query against a table whose metadata is invalidated, Impala reloads the associated metadata before the query proceeds. As this is a very expensive operation compared to the incremental metadata update done by the REFRESH statement, when possible, prefer REFRESH rather than INVALIDATE METADATA.

 

INVALIDATE METADATA is required when the following changes are made outside of Impala, in Hive and other Hive clients, such as SparkSQL:

Metadata of existing tables changes.
New tables are added, and Impala will use the tables.
The SERVER or DATABASE level Sentry privileges are changed.
Block metadata changes, but the files remain the same (HDFS rebalance).
UDF jars change.
Some tables are no longer queried, and you want to remove their metadata from the catalog and coordinator caches to reduce memory requirements.
No INVALIDATE METADATA is needed when the changes are made by impalad.

I hope that explains to you why and gives you options to use rather than warm start impala. If you know what table you want to query the run this before by qualify db. table name. This has saved me time with my data scientists and encapsulating them in their scripts is a good thing 

INVALIDATE METADATA [[db_name.]table_name]

Recomputing the statistics is another solution 

Compute stats <table name>;


COMPUTE STATS statement gathers information about the volume and distribution of data in a table and all associated columns and partitions. The information is stored in the Hive metastore database and used by Impala to help optimize queries.
Hope that enlightens you.

View solution in original post

1 REPLY 1

Re: Warm up impala

Mentor

@drgenious 

Primo Impala shares metadata [data about data] with HMS Hive Metastore.
Impala uses HDFS caching to provide performance and scalability benefits in production environments where Impala queries and other Hadoop jobs operate on quantities of data much larger than the physical RAM on the DataNodes, making it impractical to rely on the Linux OS cache, which only keeps the most recently used data in memory. Data read from the HDFS cache avoids the overhead of checksumming and memory-to-memory copying involved when using data from the Linux OS cache.

 

Having said that when you restart impala you are discarding all the Cached Metadata [Location of table, permissions, query execution plans, or statistics] that makes it efficient. That explains why after the restart your queries are so slow.


Impala is very efficient if it reads from data that is pinned in memory through HDFS caching. It takes advantage of the HDFS API and reads the data from memory rather than from disk whether the data files are pinned using Impala DDL statements, or using the command-line mechanism where you specify HDFS paths.

There is no better source of Impala information than Cloudera I will urge you to take time and read the below documentation to pin the option in your memory 🙂

 

Using HDFS Caching with Impala
Configuring HDFS Caching for Impala

There are 2 other options that you should think of as less expensive than restarting Impala I can't imagine you you have more than 70 data nodes

 

INVALIDATE METADATA

Is an asynchronous operation that simply discards the loaded metadata from the catalog and coordinator caches. After that operation, the catalog and all the Impala coordinators only know about the existence of databases and tables and nothing more. Metadata loading for tables is triggered by any subsequent queries.

REFRESH

Reloads the metadata synchronously. REFRESH is more lightweight than doing a full metadata load after a table has been invalidated. REFRESH cannot detect changes in block locations triggered by operations like HDFS balancer, hence causing remote reads during query execution with negative performance implications.


The INVALIDATE METADATA statement marks the metadata for one or all tables as stale. The next time the Impala service performs a query against a table whose metadata is invalidated, Impala reloads the associated metadata before the query proceeds. As this is a very expensive operation compared to the incremental metadata update done by the REFRESH statement, when possible, prefer REFRESH rather than INVALIDATE METADATA.

 

INVALIDATE METADATA is required when the following changes are made outside of Impala, in Hive and other Hive clients, such as SparkSQL:

Metadata of existing tables changes.
New tables are added, and Impala will use the tables.
The SERVER or DATABASE level Sentry privileges are changed.
Block metadata changes, but the files remain the same (HDFS rebalance).
UDF jars change.
Some tables are no longer queried, and you want to remove their metadata from the catalog and coordinator caches to reduce memory requirements.
No INVALIDATE METADATA is needed when the changes are made by impalad.

I hope that explains to you why and gives you options to use rather than warm start impala. If you know what table you want to query the run this before by qualify db. table name. This has saved me time with my data scientists and encapsulating them in their scripts is a good thing 

INVALIDATE METADATA [[db_name.]table_name]

Recomputing the statistics is another solution 

Compute stats <table name>;


COMPUTE STATS statement gathers information about the volume and distribution of data in a table and all associated columns and partitions. The information is stored in the Hive metastore database and used by Impala to help optimize queries.
Hope that enlightens you.

View solution in original post